A Very Insightful Blog That I Highly Recommend Checking Out

  
It has been a while since I posted anything and that is mainly due to a hectic workload and my final year of study; I have also been working on some personal projects and contemplating the idea of a co-hosted podcast with a very good friend. 

So what is this recommendation?

A wholly refreshing and new take on various different things. Right now there are some great written pieces on areas of the video game industry; these are written with heightened passion and wise words. You will also find a deeply, thought provoking, article on mental health that will make you think twice about the hand that you are dealt. 
CHECK OUT THE BLOG HERE!!

I know that, in time, there will be far more articles worth checking out; if you can spare a moment to see what all the fuss is about (and give my own blog a follow) it would be greatly appreciated.

Sit tight for some more exploration in to the World of horror.

Thanks!

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How Dr. Caligari Came About

 


Films always seem that bit more interesting when you can link them back to real life events. I am sure that a film being based on true events is one of the attractions within horror; it is that bit more scary when you know that the scenes unfolding actually happened. Perhaps this is because a fear of the same happening to you is created, or perhaps it is because you have a sudden realisation that the world is more f*cked up than you choose to accept. Either way, it is a definite ‘pro’ in regards to the techniques employed in horror film.

With that in mind, it was not until recently, that I chose to do a bit of research in to the background of Robert Weine’s classic expressionism piece. Along my journey, I found out that Weine was never supposed to direct The Cabinet of Dr Caligari. Erich Pommer who purchased the original screenplay by Hanz Janowitz and Carl Mayer, originally wanted Fritz Lang to direct the production but this was not possible due to Lang’s busy schedule. Pommer crucially hired Hermann Warm to design the production, the expressionist art director made the film the greatest depiction of German expressionism ever made.

This was interesting enough to draw me in to a deeper discovery. I researched further and found out that The Cabinet of Dr Caligari was in fact based on true events and the inspiration for the film was interesting to say the least.

Late one night, Janowitz was travelling home through a seedy area of Hamburg where a fair had made a stop. He suddenly heard laughter and his attention was drawn to a woman who was disappearing in to some bushes along a path. Janowitz, trying not to draw any attention to himself, stuck around for a short while; it is then that he saw a man emerge from the same bush alone. The man walked away and that was the end of that. Well, at least until the next morning. The following morning, the newspapers were plastered with a story that told of a woman murdered in the very same area that Janowitz had been the night before. The events stayed with Janowitz for a long time and you could say that the images haunted him. Eventually, he shared the events with fellow writer, Carl Meyer; the two set about writing a screenplay based on the events that night.

So we had our somnambulist, but what about our hypnotist?

At some point throughout the writing process, Meyer shared a piece of his past that would fill in the gaps. The event from Meyer’s past involved an unsettling experience with a strange psychiatrist who wore spectacles. Sound familiar?

The two writers spliced together their past experiences and through Hermann Warm and Robert Weine’s direction, the story became what it is today. Watching the film sent chills down my spine anyway. It is a solid mix of artistic Beauty and a creepy story and seemingly a mix that was destined to disturb me to the core.

Knowing that it is loosely based on actual people and that the creepy fair actually existed disturb me further and make me appreciate this film even more.

The Nightmare: Appreciation

Anyone that suffers with sleep paralysis is more than familiar with the mixture of opinions that circulate. A lucid dream, hallucination, or something of the occult; truth be told, nobody actually knows what the reasons are for the terrifying side effects and a recent documentary was a huge let down in regards to the study of this subject – I would write a review but i’m not going to waste my time. Instead, enjoy this interpretation of one of the differing opinions. Freudian or a representation of a genuine nightmare?

John_Henry_Fuseli_-_The_Nightmare

The Nightmare is a 1781 oil painting by Anglo-Swiss artist Henry Fuseli (1741–1825). Since its creation, it has remained Fuseli’s best-known work. With its first exhibition in 1782 at the Royal Academy of London, the image became famous; an engraved version was widely distributed and the painting was parodied in political satire. Due to its fame, Fuseli painted at least three other versions of the painting.

– Wikipedia.